Movement Ecology of Animals

Homepage of Dr. Emily A. McKinnon

Does what happens in the Tropics stay in the Tropics?

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Does what happens in the Tropics stay in the Tropics? Temperate-dwelling people who ‘migrate’ to the Tropics often show ‘carry-over effects’ of their overwintering period upon their return. Those who spent a week or two at an all-inclusive resort might come home relaxed, tanned, perhaps fatter or fitter, depending on the individual preference. I often returned from my tropical sojourns bug-bitten, tired, but elated at the experience. But what about the birds? How does their Tropical stay affect them, once they leave?

We migrate home from Belize on a plane (some times we even get to co-pilot the puddle-jumpers to Belize City!)... Wood Thrush have to wing it there on their own power.

We migrate home from Belize on a plane (sometimes I even get to co-pilot the puddle-jumpers to Belize City!)… Wood Thrush have to wing it there on their own power.

I’ve already blogged about how Wood Thrushes show a decline in body condition over the winter period, ending up in rough shape (at least in Belize) right before they have to leave on spring migration. So what happens on spring migration? Does it matter if they are in poor condition, or in poor-quality habitat in winter? Or do their migration genes just get them on their way, regardless of what condition they are in?

Come back next year, Wood Thrush (with your backpack still on, please)!

Come back next year, Wood Thrush (with your backpack still on, please)!

I tried to answer these questions by combining our geolocator-tracking data (from Belize and also from across the breeding and wintering range) with body condition data and remote sensing of habitat dryness. For the latter, there is a nifty satellite-derived index of habitat quality called NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index – see figure below). It basically is a picture of the world from space, and the greenness of each pixel in the picture has a value. The more green, the higher the NDVI value, the more productive (as in plant productivitiy), wet, and full of bugs a particular forest is; conversely, less green = less productive, drier, and correspondingly fewer bugs. We know that Wood Thrush body condition is correlated with habitat dryness and bugginess, so this makes the NDVI a good remote indicator of habitat quality.

NDVI

This is what the Normalized Vegetation Difference Index looks like for the world in March – lots of snow in the North, but green in the Tropics and in the temperate south.

We also have our detailed migration data from geolocators. Just a reminder: these are archival tags (they don’t transmit data) that give us estimates of latitudes and longitudes for each day based on light levels (sunrise/set times and day length). From these data we can determine latitude and longitude, and thus migration timing, i.e. departure date, date crossing the Gulf of Mexico (about the halfway point for Wood Thrushes) and date of arrival at breeding sites. We can also figure out migration distance, speed (overall distance/duration in days), and the number of days spent at stopover sites.

We expected that birds in poor body condition (smaller than expected based on their size) would show negative carry-over effects on migration. For example, a skinny bird might have to delay its departure, or travel more slowly, stopping more frequently along the way, resulting in a later arrival at breeding sites. The breeding arrival date is really critical because this predicts reproductive success in many species. Late arrivers either get crappy territories (males) or crappy mates (females) and which results in fewer babies for those birds in the long run. Of course really poor condition probably results in not surviving spring migration at all! But we can’t measure this because we only have information from birds that survived to bring us back their migration-tracking geolocator. Definitely a bias, but an unavoidable one at the moment.

So we compared body condition of my Belize birds to their spring migration performance. Surprisingly, we found that birds in poor condition didn’t do anything significantly different from those in the best condition! Their timing, stopover behaviour, and speeds were not significantly related to their condition. If you squint hard at the data, it’s almost the opposite effect – birds in good condition hung on later than those in the worst condition!

Wood Thrushes in good shape (body condition positive) were not earlier to leave than birds in poor shape (negative condition index). There was also no difference in timing later during migration, in speed, duration, or distance travelled.

Wood Thrushes in good shape (body condition positive) were not earlier to leave than birds in poor shape (negative condition index). There was also no difference in timing later during migration, in speed, duration, or distance travelled.

Given that this was a pretty small sample size (under 30 birds) all from the same location (Belize), I thought I would expand my tests using some of our other lab tracking data. This is where the NDVI comes in. I had migration data from Wood Thrushes tagged at a breeding site in Pennsylvania, USA – we knew where these guys were in the winter, and using NDVI we could remotely measure the quality of the habitat. I compared  winter habitat quality to spring migration performance to see if birds wintering in drier sites had poor performance compared to birds in wetter sites.

Birds breeding in Pennsylvania wintered in the central part of the winter range, and I looked at the NDVI for each specific winter site to see if drier forests affected their migrations in spring.

Birds breeding in Pennsylvania wintered in the central part of the winter range, and I looked at the NDVI for each specific winter site to see if drier forests affected their migrations in spring.

I found some support for the idea that winter habitat carries-over to affect spring migration. Birds in drier sites departed significantly later than birds in wetter sites; however, the dry-site birds caught up! There was no difference in timing by the midpoint of migration (at the Gulf of Mexico) or by the time they arrived at breeding sites. If these dry-winter-site birds are catching up, they must be moving faster, and sure enough, I found that lower NDVI was associated with faster speeds and shorter spring migration duration. Overall this shows that birds in very dry winter sites may take longer to depart, but they seem to be able to compensate for this en route and arrive at their breeding site without delay.

The last part of my study involved comparing migration performance of birds from my Belize study site, and a site in Costa Rica (La Selva, where co-author Calandra Stanley did the ground-work; she’s now doing a PhD at the Smithsonian/University of Maryland). These two sites are interesting because they are really different in terms of habitat moisture – Belize is always drier, and it dries out faster than Costa Rica. How do these broad-scale differences in habitat quality relate to migration?

Callie Stanley with a Wood Thrush. Her part of this project was the La Selva Costa Rica work, although now she works in Belize on Wood Thrushes.

Callie Stanley with a Wood Thrush. Her part of this project was the La Selva Costa Rica work, although now she works in Belize on Wood Thrushes.

For starters, the Costa Rica birds migrate about 1000km farther on average than the Belize birds! They also depart later and have later timing along their entire migration. Interestingly, the Costa Rican birds go further but stop for about the same number of nights as the Belize birds, indicating that they are more efficient in their migration somehow. This might be because they have significantly longer wings. Overall this goes a long way to explain the species-wide leap-frog migration pattern in Wood Thrushes. We showed in our previous work that Wood Thrushes from the southern parts of the wintering range (e.g. Costa Rica), migrate to the farthest northeast of the breeding range (e.g. up-state New York), essentially ‘leap-frogging‘ over the birds in the middle (e.g. the Belize birds tend to breed in the southeast). The relationship I show with migration and habitat quality could be what’s maintaining this overall, species-level pattern. Birds in Costa Rica can afford to stay longer because the forest is still relatively productive, and their farther breeding sites would still be under snow cover anyway. In contrast, the Belize birds face an increasingly hostile (i.e. dry) winter site. It likely pays for them to get outta dodge earlier and head for their breeding sites in the southeast US, where spring has already sprung. They don’t need to worry about fuelling up as much as the Costa Rica birds either, because they are covering a lot less ground.

Wood Thrushes in Costa Rica are in wetter habitat, and they migrate on average 1000km further than Wood Thrush from drier habitat in Belize.

Wood Thrushes in Costa Rica are in wetter habitat, and they migrate on average 1000km further than Wood Thrush from drier habitat in Belize.

So overall, what happens in the Tropics doesn’t seem to have much of an effect on individual Wood Thrushes (and where it does, they seem to be able to compensate by speeding up their migration). But the overall patterns of habitat quality (drier in the north, wetter in the south) are correlated with broad-scale differences in migration behaviour (earlier timing, shorter distances in the north; later timing, longer distances in the south) leading to the leap-frog system that we see at the species-level.

If you think this is as interesting as I do (although I admit I’m biased!), you might want to read the whole paper, found here:

McKinnon, EA, Stanley, CQ, and BJM Stutchbury. 2015. Carry-over effects of nonbreeding habitat on start-to-finish spring migration performance of a songbird. PLOS ONE.

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